English and Communication Division

We’re working to help you get from where you are to where you want to be!

 

People often find writing intimidating, but here at CVCC you will find yourself guided through our composition sequence by writing instructors who strive to make this process approachable, engaging, and practical.  We are constantly working to introduce new teaching strategies and practices to take the fear and intimidation out of the writing process in order to help students find their own voices as they learn to write clearly and coherently.

ENG 099. Introduction to College Writing (1-0-1IC)
Prerequisite: Appropriate ACT score, high school GPA and English IV grade, or Accuplacer Score This course is a co-requisite

English course paired with ENG 101. Emphasis is placed on providing student with additional academic and noncognitive support with the goal of success in the students’ paired ENG 101 class. The material covered or practiced in the ENG 099 course
is complementary to and supportive of material taught in ENG 101 and the needs of the ENG 099 students.

ENR 098. Writing and Reading for College (4-0-4IC)
Prerequisite: Appropriate ACT score, high school GPA and English IV grade, or Accuplacer Score

This course will integrates reading and writing skills students need to comprehend and interact with college-level texts and to produce original college-level writing. Reading skills will center on processes for literal and critical comprehension, as well as the development of vocabulary skills. Writing skills will focus on using an effective writing process including generating ideas,
drafting, organizing, revising, and editing to produce competent essays using standard written English. This course may include an one-hour lab component.

ENG 100. Vocational Technical English (3-0-3)
Core, Area I 
Prerequisite: Completion of ENR 098, appropriate ACT score, high school GPA and English IV grade, or Accuplacer Score

This course is designed to enhance reading and writing skills for the workplace. Emphasis is placed on technical reading, job-related vocabulary,k sentence writing, punctuation, and spelling with substantial focus on occupational performance requirements. Upon completion, students should be able to identify main ideas with supporting details and produce mechanically correct short writings appropriate to the workplace. Code A

ENG 101. English Composition I (3-0-3)
Core, Area I
Prerequisite: Completion of ENR 098, appropriate ACT score, high school GPA and English IV grade, or Accuplacer Score

English Composition I provides instruction and practice in the writing of at least four extended compositions and the development of rhetorical strategies, analytical and critical reading skills, and basic reference and documentation skills in the composition process. English Composition I may include instruction and practice in library usage and information literacy. Code A

ENG 102. English Composition II (3-0-3) Core, Area I
Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENG 101 or the equivalent

English Composition II provides instruction and practice in the writing of at least four extended compositions or equivalent assignments of which at least one is a research project using outside source and/or references effectively and legally. Additionally, English Composition II provides instruction in the development of analytical and critical reading skills in the composition process. English Composition II may include instruction and practice library usage and information
literacy. Code A

Contact:

Anna McGhee English & Reading Instructor
anna.mcghee@cv.edu
IPAC 116
334-291-4960

CVCC teaches American Literature I & II (Eng 251/252) and World Literature I &II (Eng 271/272) courses in addition to a Classical Mythology (Eng 277) course. 

The American and World Literature courses are designed to be survey courses organized around different eras.  Each course explores literature (poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fiction) from the Ancients all the way up to modern day with a focus on the history, philosophy, and diversity of each era.

The Classical Mythology course (Eng 277) explores how mythology (primarily Greek and Roman) has influenced Western literature.  This course also examines how ancient myths (Egyptian and Mesopotamian, for example) influenced the Greeks and Romans and how mythology continues to invade our modern pop culture.

To take a literature course, students will need to have successfully completed English 102.

ENG 251. American Literature I (3-0-3)
Core, Area II
Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENG 102 or the equivalent

This course is a survey of American literature from its beginning to the mid-nineteenth century. Emphasis is placed on representative works and writers of this period and on the literary, cultural, historical, and philosophical forces that shaped these works and that are reflected in them. Code A

ENG 252. American Literature II (3-0-3)
Core, Area II
Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENG 102 or the equivalent

This course is a survey of American literature from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Emphasis is placed on representative works and writers of this period and on the literary, cultural, historical, and philosophical forces that shaped these works and that are reflected in them. Code A

ENG 271. World Literature I (3-0-3)
Core, Area II
Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENG 102 or the equivalent

This course is a study of world literature from its inception to the mid-seventeenth century. Emphasis is placed on representative works and writers of this period and on the literary, cultural, historical, and philosophical forces that shaped these works and that are reflected in them. Code A

ENG 272. World Literature II (3-0-3)
Core, Area II
Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENG 102 or the equivalent

This course is a study of world literature from the mid-seventeenth century to the present. Emphasis is placed on representative works and writers of this period and on the literary, cultural, historical, and philosophical forces that shaped these works and that are reflected in them. Code A

ENG 277. Classical Mythology (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENG 102 or the equivalent

This course is a study of Greek and Roman mythology and the influence of classical mythology on Western literature. Emphasis is placed on various classical myths and on the influence on Western literature of these myths. Students will demonstrate through tests and papers an understanding of classical myths and their relationship to Western literature. Code C

Contact:

Samantha Vance Chair English & Communications Division, Chair
samantha.vance@cv.edu
IPAC 113
334-291-4974

Creative Writing is a class where students get to explore imaginative forms of literature through the creative writing process.  The course may also involve instruction on publishing, and students will compose a significant body of imaginative literature, which will be shared with the class.  Journaling, reading responses, and workshopping will all be part of the course instruction.  Students will compose works of prose, poetry, fiction, and non-fiction, and explore various genres and sub-genres. 

To enroll in creative writing, students will need to have completed English 101.

ENG 246. Creative Writing I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENG 101

This course provides instruction and practice in the writing of critical analysis of imaginative forms of literature. Emphasis is placed on originality in the creative writing process and this course may include instruction on publishing. Students will compose a significant body of imaginative literature which may be read by or to the class. Code C

ENG 247
PREREQUISITE: ENG 246 and/or as required by program.
A continuation of ENG 246, this course provides instruction and practice in the writing of critical analysis of imaginative forms of literature. Emphasis is placed on originality in the creative writing process, and this course may include instruction on publishing. Students will compose a significant body of imaginative literature, which may be read by or to the class.

ENG 248
PREREQUISITE: ENG 247 and/or as required by program.
A continuation of ENG 247, this course provides instruction and practice in the writing of critical analysis of imaginative forms of literature. Emphasis is placed on originality in the creative writing process, and this course may include instruction on publishing. Students will compose a significant body of imaginative literature, which may be read by or to the class.

Contact:

Heather Royse English Instructor
heather.royse@cv.edu
IPAC 110
334-291-4961

Ethics (IDS 102) is the study of what should be permitted, forbidden, and required in society.  This course covers the basic ethical theories stretching all the way back to the Virtue Ethics introduced to us by individuals like Plato and running right up to the “You do You” Subjectivism of the 21st Century.   It applies those theories to our modern moral problems and ethical questions – like environmental and business ethics, questions like cloning and abortion are topics that are covered in this course.  Be ready to open your mind and think about some things in new ways. 

This course meets the same requirements as PHL 216 at most four-year universities.

IDS 102. Ethics (3-0-3)

This course introduces the student to the basic concepts, types and schools of moral theory, and illustrates how these may be applied to contemporary moral problems and ethical questions in academic, professional and social endeavors. Code A

This course meets the same requirements as PHL 216 at most four-year universities.

Contact:

Samantha Vance Chair English & Communications Division, Chair
samantha.vance@cv.edu
IPAC 113
334-291-4974

The Humanities courses are high interest classes that have no pre-requisites.  These courses cover a variety of topics, all of which combine history, art, music, and philosophy.

Humanities 101 - Introduction to Humanities I is an exploration of the Victorian Era.  Their music, history, and society have shaped who we are and continue to shape us even today.  Under their top hats and crinolines, we find Jack the Ripper, grave robbers, prostitution, and slums.  This class asks student to read, watch, and write about the Victorians.  It examines the dark and the light, the good and the bad, the naughty and the nice, while exploring how the Victorians continue to mold today’s society, 150 years later.

HUM 101. Introduction to Humanities I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: As required by program.

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence which offers the student an introduction to the humanities using selections from art, music, literature, history, and philosophy which relates to a unifying theme. Code A

Humanities 102 – Introduction to Humanities II continues the exploration from the Victorians to the United States’ Progressive Era.  Welcome to the Roaring 20’s – booze, flappers, and mobsters abound.   This course asks students to read, write, and evaluate the Progressive Era through the people, major events, and social reforms prevalent from 1900-1929.  The class also examines parallels between then and now, and how the Progressives shaped modern America.

HUM 102. Introduction to Humanities II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: As required by program.

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence which offers the student an introduction to the humanities using selections from art, music, literature, history, and philosophy which relates to a unifying theme. Code A

Humanities 106 – Humanities through the Arts is a film study class where student will view several films and explore their cultural relevance. Students will study Snow White as an example of early animation and a coming of age tale, Moulin Rouge as a genre-reinventing musical and snapshot of the end of a century, Vertigo as a model of mystery/suspense, and Hidden Figures as a look at 1960s cultural revolution in the realms of race, gender, and STEM. 

HUM 106. Humanities Through the Arts (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: As required by program.

This course is an integrated survey of file, drama, music, literature, painting, sculpture, and architecture. Code C

Humanities 299 – PTK Honors Course is the course attached to Phi Theta Kappa, but students do not have to be members of PTK to take the course.  This class explores leadership throughout history by examining literature, music, and film.  Students read and study novels, poetry, short stories, and films in their quest to understand the strengths and weaknesses of leadership throughout history.  Grab your popcorn and join us to study leadership in PTK!

HUM 299. PTK Honors Course (3-0-3)

This course combines HUM 299-01, -02, and -03 into a single semester course with a total of 3 credit hours (not repeatable for credit). It provides an opportunity for the student to study selected topics in the area of the humanities under the supervision of a qualified instructor. The topics selected will be broad in scope and content rather than specific, and will reference important cultural works from a variety of areas, which may include literature, religious studies, speech, foreign languages, art, music, theatre, and dance. Code A

Contact:

Katherine Henderson English Instructor
katherine.henderson@cv.edu
IPAC 109
334-291-4912

Being able to communicate effectively is one of the greatest advantages a student has when entering the workforce in today’s job market.   It is the key to successful relationships in our professional lives and our personal lives, as well.  Our Speech Department strives to improve our students’ communications skills on a one-on-one level as well as in group settings or in a public speaking scenario.

Communication Classes

Both of these courses are transferable and are great stepping-stones to a communications degree at a four-year university, but Georgia universities only accept SPH 107 as their general education speech course requirement.

Fundamentals of Oral Communication (Sph 106) is a performance course that is based on the study of human communication on all levels: interpersonal, small group, and public speaking.  It requires speeches, but also explores other forms of communication.

SPH 106. Fundamentals of Oral Communication (3-0-3)
Core, Area II

This is a performance course that includes the principles of human communication: intrapersonal, interpersonal, and public. The course surveys current communication theory and provides practical application. Code A

Fundamentals of Public Speaking (Sph 107) is the course more commonly associated with the presentation of formal speeches.  This course involves the planning, rehearsing, and presenting of speeches to specific audiences. 

SPH 107. Fundamentals of Public Speaking (3-0-3)
Core, Area II

This course explores principles of audience and environment analysis as well as the actual planning, rehearsing, and presenting of formal speeches to specific audiences. Historical foundations, communication theories, and student performances are emphasized. Code A

Contact:

Nekita Tingle Speech Instructor
nekita.tingle@cv.edu
IPAC 111
334-291-4971

Introductory Spanish I (Spa 101) is a basic introduction to Spanish.  Student learn to speak Spanish in a practical environment and practice their conversational skills.  The course teaches an appreciation for Spanish-speaking areas. The course in interactive and engaging, regardless of whether it is taught in an in-person, hybrid, or online environment.

SPA 101. Introductory Spanish I (4-0-4)
Core, Area II

This course provides an introduction to Spanish. Topics include: the development of basic communication skills and the acquisition of basic knowledge of the cultures of Spanish-speaking areas. Code A

Introductory Spanish II (Spa 102) is a continuation of the skills learned in Spanish I.  Students continue to develop their conversational Spanish while experiencing and developing an appreciation for the cultures  and people of Spanish-speaking areas.

SPA 102. Introductory Spanish II (4-0-4)
Core, Area II
Prerequisite: SPA 101 or equivalent

This continuation course includes the development of basic communication skills and the acquisition of basic knowledge of the cultures of Spanish-speaking areas. Code A

Contact:

Tokema Watts – Spanish Adjunct Instructor (online only)
Tokema.watts@cv.edu


Samantha VanceChair English & Communications Division, Chair
samantha.vance@cv.edu
IPAC 113
334-291-4974
Katherine Henderson English Instructor
katherine.henderson@cv.edu
IPAC 109
334-291-4912
Heather RoyseEnglish Instructor
heather.royse@cv.edu
IPAC 110
334-291-4961
Anna McGheeEnglish Instructor
anna.mcghee@cv.edu
IPAC 116
334-291-4960
Nekita TingleSpeech Instructor
nekita.tingle@cv.edu
IPAC 111
334-291-4971